Grounded in Simplicity

Being Grounded and Focusing on What Matters

January 04, 2022 Bonnie Von Dohre, Danielle McCoy Season 2 Episode 1
Grounded in Simplicity
Being Grounded and Focusing on What Matters
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, we're talking about being "busy" and how to avoid falling into the trap by aligning with our priorities and adjusting our measures of success.

We're also talking about finding balance as homesteaders, moms, and wives while trying to keep some of our sanity intact.

Links mentioned in this episode:
Season 1 Episode 2: Is Self Sufficiency a Myth?

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Bonnie Von Dohre:

Welcome to the Grounded in Simplicity Podcast where we are helping moms get back to the basics and learn to find joy in being less busy. I'm Bonnie from The Not so Modern Housewife, and I am joined with my friend Danielle, from The Rustic Elk. So being grounded...

Danielle McCoy:

Like your parents grounded you?

Bonnie Von Dohre:

No, not like that. Kind of... Well, so it's funny. And I've always, I've always had this feeling about, like being a blogger in the homesteading niche is there's a lot, it feels almost like, you can either be the professional blogger who writes about doing all of this stuff and promotes it and does all of the things that everybody tells you, you have to do because you're a professional blogger. Or you can actually, you know, go outside and do it. It doesn't feel like there's enough time to do both things. And I will admit, when I get anxious about things, and I get stressed out about things, I get tunnel vision. And so I only focus on, like the thing that I think is going to get me the result. And this last week, well, I mean, actually, I kind of came to this realization a couple weeks ago, but especially this last week, I was just like, No, I am, I'm going to get outside, because I didn't have a spring garden because of the eye infection. And I didn't have a summer garden, because Florida. So here I am, it's almost December, and I don't even have a fall garden. So we went out, and we set up seed trays, and we started our seeds. And I'm working on getting everything weeded and cleared out in the garden. And like taking more time to be out with my animals, I think it was last week, I actually gave my old horse a bath and I need to go out and brush her and stuff too. But just, you know, the whole thing that we want this podcast to be about is kind of taking a step back from everything we think we need to do with our lives. And just doing like really refocusing on the things that actually do matter, instead of the things that you know, we were told that matter or because there's no rules. I mean, the rules are arbitrary. I mean, we're told our whole lives like you have to do XY and Z. And yet, if you go to another country, you live in another culture guess what, nobody in that country or that culture is doing X y&z Because they have another set of standards, another set of priorities. So we get to decide what our own standards are, we get to decide what our own priorities are. And we get to live in tune with that. We don't need to worry about what anyone else's priorities are.

Danielle McCoy:

Right? I think that's a problem in our society, because we have success and busyness is busyness. Like if you're busy, then you must be successful. And it's really, really hard. Your answer to everything's always how are you? Well, I'm busy, because that means that you must be successful, right? Because you're constantly harried and busy and overwhelmed. And it's can be difficult to slow down. And because then you feel like you're not successful by societal standards, which makes you feel like crap. So, right?

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Well, and a no. And honestly, half the time I want to, I'm coming to the realization that apparently I had ADHD. And I couldn't imagine why, you know, like, I'm trying to juggle 5 million plates at the same time. But I will have like, I'll have a simple project that I want to accomplish, except in order to get to the point where I can even do said, project, I have to do all of these things. And then once I'm done with that project, I have to do all of these things. And I can't let anything distract me during that entire time period of me doing all the things, because then I'm going to forget what I was doing in the first place. And I'm going to go over and do this set of things. And then before I know it, it's like, the end of the day, and it's bed time and well, crap, I never finished that project. And then guess what, that project never gets done, because I never make it back to it. And I'm trying really hard to be like, No, you know what, I don't need to do all of these 100 things today. I will be okay, if I just do this. And that will be my measure of success for the day.

Danielle McCoy:

Right? I think I think we have to do that. You know, I think writing down you can write down the whole list of things that you want to accomplish, but you know, make sure that you accomplish whatever your top priority is. And then if you get anything else done then great and if you don't, then you should still I'll consider yourself successful for the day because you got that, you know, top tier priority

Bonnie Von Dohre:

accomplished. Yeah, that's yeah, one system that I was using that I need to force myself to do again. I, if anyone from Apple tech and development is listening, I need a screen on my phone. And I don't need the Good morning, here's today's temperature screen, I eat the screen of this is your morning routine. And we're unlocking your phone until you check off each of these things. And then my morning routine needs to include sitting down doing my brain dump and actually like outlining my day, because everything goes a lot smoother when I do that. And yet, I will get busy. And I'll get preoccupied with all these other things as soon as I wake up. And then by the time, I think to sit down and do my planning, half the days over. And then by that point, what's the point of planning? Because I've already lost half a day?

Danielle McCoy:

Why don't you do it at night?

Bonnie Von Dohre:

I don't have the brain function to do it at night. Well, I've tried it sounds great in theory. And I'm just like, Nope, I can't I can't string two words together, complete a thought so much less Think of what I'm going to do the next day.

Danielle McCoy:

One way that apparently doesn't work for Bonnie that you can plan your day is to finish your day. And then before you go to bed, make sure you plan out what you're going to do tomorrow, you can, you know, check your calendar, if you make a list of the things you need to accomplish for a week. Like for us, like we both need to write blog posts or record a podcast, whatever those things may be, and you have your children, right, you have your personal things and you have your work things and you will list them all down and then you fit them in a different time slots during the day and plan it out the night before. There are ways to plan your day Vani.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

There are ways

Danielle McCoy:

see this, this, this is the big mystery, I

Bonnie Von Dohre:

probably need to delete, like 95% of the apps that are on my phone. Um, anyway. That goes back to the whole like, we get caught up in being content creators, we have to, we have to create content, we have to pay attention to realtors content, so we know what the trends are. And

Danielle McCoy:

you got to be on every social media platform in existence, like 24 hours a day,

Bonnie Von Dohre:

I'm getting better with not trying to do that.

Danielle McCoy:

In reading or blogs.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

No one needs to know. All right. So the squirrels that are in my brain get distracted very easily by shiny objects. And for some reason, this week, the squirrels decided that the Not So Modern housewife is not well keyword because I was doing SEO research. And I thought maybe I should just totally rebrand everything and changed my blog name. You I mean, you talked me down, you talked me down from the ledge. So thank you, we're good.

Danielle McCoy:

Sometimes, like you're good.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

All right. So the one system that I was following is you do your brain dump, you listed all the things, but then you prioritize what are the actual important things that will move the needle, get progress, you know, actually, like make you feel good at the end of the day that you accomplish something. And please like me saying all of that don't think this is distracting from being grounded. Because it's, again, it goes back to what are your priorities and we need to kind of change our measures of what we consider productive and successful. If what you consider productive and as successful as you actually wash, dry fold and put away an entire load of laundry, then you've accomplished more than I have on most days. So that being said, anyway, so you figure out what your priorities are out of that list of things that you're going to accomplish. You figure out what is low priority and what you can delegate to someone else to do because you do not need to do all of the things. You transfer the important things to your planner or to you know, something that's going to keep track of the things that you're actually going to do that day, and then you throw away the rest of the list. Because otherwise it's going to distract you. And when doing those priorities gets hard or feels overwhelming or you know, whatever, your brain is going to go well if I just do these things, they're not going to take very much time and I can just knock them out really fast. And this is what happens to me most days is I do the things that I can just knock out really fast. And six hours later I have stayed long the entire day and I have accomplished nothing. So this is this is me, telling myself what I need to do on a daily basis. I

Danielle McCoy:

think I think getting out in nature helps. Like we went for a walk the other day. And I think it, it helps keep you grounded. And you can clear your mind and figure out what your priorities are just by getting outside and going for a walk for a few minutes. It doesn't have to be anything long. But I think that can help you accomplish what you just said, making sure you know, you're setting your priorities the way that you want to if you get outside and get some fresh air, and

Bonnie Von Dohre:

well, it really does help to clear your head. And I know when I get outside, I know that if once I go inside, I'm not going to make it back outside. So I find myself finding excuses to stay outside and get stuff done outside. Because I don't want to go back inside and like kill that momentum. Right? I mean, there's certainly plenty of things that I need to do outside. And of course, the longer I ignore those things outside, the more that stresses me out, because I'm just thinking about all of the things that I need to do. Because, I mean, honestly, we pick the things that are our priorities, right. And the other things they can, they really can wait until later, like your your house does not have to be spotless, you do not have to have all of your laundry washed every single day. Like, you know, it won't kill you to eat leftovers, you know that, like, you know, we have to figure out what things we are okay with kind of cutting out so that we have the time, you know, to focus on the other things that are our priority. A lot of people are stressed out about the food system right now. And they want to figure out, like how they can garden and do all of these other things. And it's like, well, if the garden is going to be your priority, then you just you make the time and you get that done first, before you worry about all the other things that you think you have to do that, once again, the rulebook is arbitrary.

Danielle McCoy:

Right? All right. So it doesn't mean that your garden has to be weed free and perfect either. So, right? Because I think a lot of people, they start doing, you know, like gardening, and they think that it all has to be all perfect, or they can't do it, or it's not successful, because that's the, you know, the mindset that we've had ingrained into us our society. So mine was full of weeds this year, we still have food, you know, I mean, it doesn't really matter as long as you're producing food. And

Bonnie Von Dohre:

yes, we need to be comfortable taking imperfect action. And I mean, I'm like, technically, I'm supposed to be a professional gardener, right? I mean, I'm, I'm selling gardening supplies, and I'm supposed to be a licensed nursery. And I'm like, and, you know, again, be like you tell people Oh, yeah, I'm a commercial grower. You know, I'm a licensed nurseries like, Oh, you got a greenhouse and you can grow like 1000s of seedlings and all this kind of like, ya know. I've got I got sheets of plywood NetBond sawhorses. We're praying for the best, but,

Danielle McCoy:

but you just do whatever works, though it doesn't really matter. Like if, if food producing your own food is priority, then you figure out a way to produce your food just like if you know, you don't have a big yard or a yard all you can still find ways to garden and grow your own food, whether it be a community garden or growing on a balcony or whatever it may be. There are ways to if that's your priority, then you have to figure out how to make it your priority.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Yeah. And having a spotless garden is not my priority. Like I want to grow food. I don't I don't need it to be weed free and perfectly manicured in order to produce food. Right.

Danielle McCoy:

I can try

Bonnie Von Dohre:

if I want. Like if I want that perfectly manicured lawn and garden and everything landscaped nicely. I'm hiring a landscaper.

Danielle McCoy:

Yes, you're gonna hire just like to at least come pull the weeds.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Guess what if I want a perfectly clean house, I am hiring a housekeeper.

Danielle McCoy:

Right? Right. And that's another thing no

Bonnie Von Dohre:

housekeeper just to have a halfway functional house. But

Danielle McCoy:

you have to that's another thing that you have to learn how to let go of some of the things that you feel like need to be just so imperfect and either delegate them by having your kids do them or delegate them to by hiring a person or just you know, letting things slide what like said your house doesn't have to be perfect your garden doesn't have to be perfect. And taking imperfect action is better than no action at all. It's more or delegating those to other people you know finding room in your budget to hire a house cheaper, or a landscaper, or whatever it may be.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

landscapers? Hi, I like pie in the sky. Probably it'd be more realistic in the short term. Well, you know. I also said, that's why I don't worry about having weeds in my garden. No, yeah, well, and, you know, being in this self sufficiency, state, space, that's the word I'm looking for. We, you know, we have a tendency to think that we need to be an island, like, we need to be completely self sufficient, we need to do it ourselves. And, you know, we had on the other podcast, you know, we have an episode before we talked about how self sufficiency is a myth. But, you know, if, if we are trying to figure out ways to be self sufficient, usually, we are also trying to figure out ways that we can make money in addition to like our homesteading efforts, and you know, we're producing our own food, but then we're trying to figure out ways that we can do handyman work or sell our excess or, you know, do these things so that we also have extra money to, you know, pay the bills and keep the animals fed and all of that. And yet, we're afraid to hire a handyman. And we're afraid to, you know, buy vegetables from somebody else who's growing something that we don't have. And it's like, no, guys, it's this, like, one doesn't work without the other. If you want to make money as a handyman, somebody's got to hire the handyman. So if I mean, and I run into this with my husband all the time, my husband is very handy. He's capable of doing well, and I know you read this too, but anyway, he's he's capable of, you know, fixing the cars and fixing the tractor, and, you know, doing all the handy stuff around the farm, and you know, all this stuff. He also works like 60 to 80 hours a week. Right? And even, you know, and on the weekends, yeah, I mean, yes, our weekends usually consist of getting all this stuff done around the farm. Although I'll be honest, the last few weeks, he's been working the weekends too. So I'm going this much better. Um, so he, like, I have to constantly remind him that the reality is, just because you are capable of doing all these things yourself. Doesn't mean you need to do all these things yourself. It doesn't mean you have time to do all of these things yourself. Right. I have no working lawnmower right now. Because the man needs to weld the deck back together.

Danielle McCoy:

Sure, doesn't work. Yeah, he's sick. He's supposed to be fixing any new carburetor. I'm like, Can we at least order it?

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Like, I mean, okay, so like, our tractor needs a new water pump. And, okay, credit. It's like a $600 part. It's not the cheapest thing in the world. So of course, my husband who like, you know, he was that kid that like, took apart toasters, as a kid just to see how they work fine, too. So he figured out that there are part numbers on all the pieces of the water pump. So if he dismantles the water pump, he can figure out exactly which part is broken. So he can order just that part. And then we'll put put it back together and pray it works. That's frugal. frugal. That is my husband's middle name. MATT The tightwad Von Dohre. Okay, so I love you honey.

Danielle McCoy:

Oh, yeah. We have that same problem, because we bought a pig. I told you, Trevor, one of the he's like, we can butcher it ourselves. I don't pay somebody 65 cents of hell. And I'm like, Are you serious right now? When are we going to butcher this pig? Right? We have to go get it, then we have to slaughter it. And then we have to hang it and then we have to take it

Bonnie Von Dohre:

all apart. I'm like, 65 cents a pound. isn't that bad? I mean, that's, that's based off the hanging weight. Right? So yes, it is like 100 $150.

Danielle McCoy:

Right. He's like, Well, I think we can do it ourselves. And like, No, I'm gonna have her send it to the they're sending it to the butcher shop. They can do it. And then I'm like, do you want to make the bacon yourself? He's like, Well, if you're already gonna pay him I'm like fine.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Now I do I do get the pork belly back so I can make my own bacon part I mean, part of that is because it's cheaper but I actually like the bacon that I make better like the bacon that I had the butcher make for me had a like a weird aftertaste to it. So I make my own bacon now.

Danielle McCoy:

But this is like my family and it's just brown. Pure so

Bonnie Von Dohre:

well. Yeah, I mean, they probably make some good bacon and ham but this guy he wasn't even doing like the curing and smoking himself. He was sending the cuts off to somebody else who was doing it because Like, Florida, you've got to be licensed special or whatever. So, right? Yeah, so I was just like, No, nevermind, I'll just do it myself. Now granted, we're gonna, we're gonna do probably 20 to 30 pounds of pork belly in my freezer that still have to be cured and smoked. And who knows how many ham rows are in there? I mean, I could actually start, I could start curing and smoking now and have some ready for Christmas. Yeah, some Christmas ham. That'd be good. There we go. I know. And I mean, my kids are constantly wanting bacon. And they're like, why they're all these packages in the freezer say bacon, but we don't have bacon. Because it's not finished. Mommy needs a bigger refrigerator. To do all of the curing.

Danielle McCoy:

So yeah. See, prioritize and

Bonnie Von Dohre:

to stop adding things to her to do list? Yes, yes. And stop creating new websites and new side projects and new things. I just liked all the things. That's just, that's, that's the, the ADHD I think I am like, if I'm like, if I'm still sleeping every night, then I'm balancing everything. That's what I told myself.

Danielle McCoy:

Sleeping for how long?

Bonnie Von Dohre:

I think I'm averaging six or seven hours when I herbal supplements that helped me sleep. Okay.

Danielle McCoy:

Fair enough. That's, that's no, no, but you just said sleeping. So I was like, Well, you know, if you're only sleeping like four hours, then that's probably

Bonnie Von Dohre:

the problem is when I get in those, like, hyper fixation modes. Because the problem is they don't hit me until like six or seven o'clock at night. And many times I ID and then I drink coffee. And so I like I have to stay up until it's finished. And then next thing I know, it's like four o'clock in the morning. So those are the night they don't get it. But I try to space those out. I try to only let this happen like a couple times a month. Actually, okay, so speaking of cycles, did you listen that podcast? I haven't yet listened to her show. Purpose show. There we go. So I was listening to her episode about syncing with your cycle. Like in your, your, how we feel more productive during certain times of the month if you're a female. And I like I definitely jive with that. Because I can definitely feel that. And those times when I get like hyper focused, and I'm trying to do all of the things like that is absolutely during my ovulation time. Right and and I mean, I'm getting to the point where like when I am feeling totally, like a slob, and unproductive and unfocused and moody and everybody's pissing me off. It's either a full moon like this week, or or it's during like that PMS week. Right? Because what is that is that the luteal phase? I'm still trying to figure out the names of the phases. But Oh. Go listen to the episode. Alright, and then go put it put it all on your Google calendar like I did. So you know how to schedule your workout. As I like, I'm so I mean, this been going on for a while. But anyway, I'm so desperate like to get my act together and actually be able to function like a normal adult, that I will try anything and see what sticks. So I'm going to try this.

Danielle McCoy:

I'm going to do I think I think it'll be effective. I really do.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

I think it will be. Yeah, I say it's all about it's, it's it really goes in line with you know, what we're talking about here too, is getting within our rhythms. I mean, because we feel it with the seasons to granted my seasons are completely backwards wherever else the seasons. But you know, we feel like that urge to kind of like hibernate in the winter. And then once we get into spring, you always get that like Rush and all that energy to clean out and spring cleaning. And so it's a lot, you know, same the only difference is I tend to hibernate in the summer and work in the winter while everybody else is working in the summer and hibernating

Danielle McCoy:

in the winter, but I just didn't hire at all so

Bonnie Von Dohre:

that's why I live in Florida. My kids say that they want to go live with us where there's snow and I'm like you don't know what you're talking about.

Danielle McCoy:

You guys should come up here and visit. We just had snow Yeah, in the summer. No, no winter.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

I've been to Indiana in the winter. It's not

Danielle McCoy:

just his sultry and nasty here in the summer and so does down there so

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Well, exactly. And that so that's why I choose to live in Florida because if I'm going to be just as hot and miserable and sweaty and gross in Ohio as I'm going to be in Florida, then I'm going to Florida.

Danielle McCoy:

I don't know, I like the seasons. I like watching all the changing leaves and the snow.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Yeah, but I mean, it's cool. Like if Ohio actually had a normal winter, it might be a different story. But at least like Central Ohio, where I was at, it was always just warm enough that we didn't get snow. So we got like sleeping ice. And then you get like, ice on everything. And that's not that's not our environment. So in lots of mud, lots and lots. And lots of

Danielle McCoy:

mud here too. Yeah.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Especially for spring. What we don't have lots of mud.

Danielle McCoy:

No, you have too much sand. We have seen it

Bonnie Von Dohre:

but everything drains. So it's good. I mean, okay. And sand. You can if you've got enough animal poop. Okay. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it. All right, as long as I have animal poop, everything is fine. All right, I think we know that your your produce is

Danielle McCoy:

grown and poop. So

Bonnie Von Dohre:

composted? I mean, how's

Danielle McCoy:

it all right, well, hey, Tipsy you didn't say that. You said poop.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

I mean, it's probably not composted very well, considering the number of weeds that I have growing from it. But I mean, you know, we we pile it all up until it's time to talk gardens off again. Trapper to scoop it and bring it to the garden for me. That's like so we also do kind of a modified, like Google culture back to Eden gardening with our raised beds. And so the tree the power guys were going through and termined all the trees. So I got like, two or three truckloads of woodchips delivered piled up next to my driveway and in the tractor broke. So it's like this giant pile of wood chips, and I have no way to move them. Because we've also broken both of the wheel barrels. And, yeah, and lawnmower. Well, the lawnmower drives. So technically, I could put the wagon on the back of the lawnmower and like and shovel it, but yeah.

Danielle McCoy:

Priorities,

Bonnie Von Dohre:

priorities. It's just not. I like I. And this is part of the reason why I get the the laser focus or the tunnel vision is, if I like let myself think about all of the things that are on the peripheral. I will literally go crazy. And I'm already halfway there anyway, so I can't, I just can't. I will focus on what I can control and the moment and deal with the rest later.

Danielle McCoy:

Yeah, that sounds like me. And then my husband compliance. He's like, why aren't you? And I'm like, because I'm doing this. Right. This is what I'm doing. I'm not doing that. That over

Bonnie Von Dohre:

there. I'm ignoring. Yes. No, I like and I will say, I, you know, I probably do need to spend less time buffering. I and I do my life goes a lot easier when I stay one step ahead of all the things. But when it crashes and burns, I'm usually the one who actually keeps a clear head about it and is like, No, this is okay, we can get through this. It's just, it's just another day in paradise. I don't let myself get pissed off about stuff. Because that was I mean, that pretty much sums up like my teenage years in my 20s is just letting myself get pissed off about everything. And then I finally came to the realization that that was only affecting me and my stress level. Right so there's no point. So now just everything is gravy. neighbor's dog show up in my yard. I don't care. As long as my chickens were good. There you go. Take them home, make friends with the neighbors. This episode was brought to you by kitchen botanicals, your sustainable gardening headquarters. Stop by kitchen botanicals calm and get a look at our 2022 seed varieties as well as As supplies and pest control products to help you with your organic garden 2022 is a great time to take care of yourself with our pampered gardener subscription box. Every month you'll receive all natural self care products untreated heirloom seeds, high quality garden tools, organic garden amendments, cute impractical supplies and fun products that we know you'll love. This is your opportunity to take care of yourself in the garden, I started the pampered gardener subscription box, because I had gone through a time of not taking care of myself and dealing with the stress that it put onto my body I was ill I was tapped out and I felt like I couldn't possibly pour any more out of my empty cup. So I created the pamper gardeners subscription box for women like me who wanted to get back to what they enjoy, but also wanted to love themselves. So we've put together this collection of gardening and self care products that are geared towards women who love to garden will get things such as gloves, lotion, bags, hats, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, things that you can actually use but also things that you'll enjoy. And don't worry, there will still be plenty of gardening tools, seeds, we've created a subscription box like no other by gardeners for gardeners order your own box today. We are actually we're supposed to get down like to 40 This next week.

Danielle McCoy:

Our high like Monday is supposed to be 30. So

Bonnie Von Dohre:

that's good. Yeah, 40 is gonna be our low sweatshirt in the morning. Maybe you could actually funny, funny story. So my kids because it's finally nice outside. Anytime I asked them to do anything, they go play on the swing set. So that's just going with the flow, just controlling what I can control. And apparently my three children are not part of that. So I look out the back window. Well, first, my daughter comes inside, and I can't she was asking me something. And she's just I mean, she's outside swinging on the swing set in her underwear. But, you know, we live in the woods, no one can see anything. And when we first moved there, there was an 80 year old nudist living next door. So nothing like this is I mean, it's still it doesn't even matter anymore. It's still better than that. But I look out the back window. And my oldest is on the swing set. And like hoodie sweatshirt, and pants swing on the swing set. And my daughter who was just on the swing set swinging with her brother is in her underwear. I'm like, so what is it like? Can someone tell me before I walk out the back door? Do I need a sweatshirt? Or can I go outside naked? Like I need clarification here. That's why like

Danielle McCoy:

my youngest won't wear a coat. She hates it. So

Bonnie Von Dohre:

did she probably start wearing clothes though. Most of the time. Most

Danielle McCoy:

days she put on a t shirt and a pair of pants today and went outside it was 36 Well, instead it was cold. But she didn't wanna wear coat.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

My kids will wear clothes in public. And then as soon as we come back home all the clothes come off. Like I know.

Danielle McCoy:

Mine wear shorts usually so

Bonnie Von Dohre:

yeah, I mean, they've got great immune systems. There you go. We can I mean, we can talk about you know, all the benefits of being naked in the dirt next episode didn't play vitamin D.

Danielle McCoy:

Oh, that's essential.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

Yeah, it's an essential nutrient that we don't have enough of in our in our diets. So yeah, there we go. They could eat eggs. Instead they're going outside naked All right. Well, I think I think we've shared too much information enough today. So

Danielle McCoy:

yeah, sounds good.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

All right. I promise. There will be a little bit more guidance and purpose. The rest of the season maybe possibly. If you've watched any or I'm sorry if you've listened to any of beyond the homestead you will know that we get off topic a fair bit but it's alright.

Danielle McCoy:

It's fine. We stay on topic.

Bonnie Von Dohre:

We did we did we did pretty good today. I think so. So pat myself on the back another episode so I finally so I had I do have to. Obviously this is not my house because I don't have a sound room in my house and I have three children and no pets have interrupted this episode either. So part of the reason we are finally able to record again is someone finally made my wishes came true and opened a recording studio in Brooksville with high speed internet and all of the fancy podcasting things. So I don't have to invest them, I just have to pay them by the hour. And that's fine by me. I get to get away from my family for you know, a couple hours a week and play with someone else's equipment that they can fix and take care of on their own. I love to do it. So yes, that is fantastic.

Danielle McCoy:

But I'm recording in my bedroom, but no, you're recording

Bonnie Von Dohre:

in your bedroom. I mean, but I mean, your kids are actually quiet so there's that.

Danielle McCoy:

Oh, and the dogs other than barking with mailman. I don't know if you can hear that. I didn't hear it. I didn't hear anything. Well see I invested in any mics. Oh, see,

Bonnie Von Dohre:

there you go. Please share this with your friends get let everybody know that we are back on the air and encourage everyone to subscribe. Please go to our Spotify or Apple whichever streaming thing that you are listening to us from and leave us a review and also we now have a Patreon and so you can go look up Grounded in Simplicity on Patreon and help to support our podcasts we have a few different membership levels and also that means that you will have exclusive access to watch us live as we're recording and ask us questions before and after. And we've got some cool merchandise over there that I don't even know if Daniel knows about yet because I was having way too much fun designing crap plus our let's see we got a discord community VIPs are going to get a discount at Kitchen Botanicals, which is my garden supply store online. And yeah, see I like we're we're going all out this year. So this is going to be a good season. And because I have a contract to be here and use this space once a week, we will be recording whether we like it or not. So yay! All right. We will catch you next time. Thank you for listening to this episode of the Grounded in simplicity podcast. If we were able to help you in any way, please share this episode with a friend. And also leave us a review on Apple podcasts. You can also join us over on Patreon at grounded simplicity and help to support this podcast as well as become a patron and get a behind the scenes look at the creation of our podcast and even have some input on future episodes.